Does this match my sofa?

Well, no, but you will have the artwork a lot longer than you have the sofa, so is that really important? And contrast is good, which in designer speak is called ‘accent colors’, so go ahead, buy that painting, pottery, art glass that you love… it truly will compliment your home, even if it doesn’t match the sofa. The simple secret to collecting artwork is to LOVE it. All else will fall into place, and you will find a place to display it – even if you think you don’t have space.

This pair of windows coordinates with the interior, but they weren't designed to match. And actually, the right hand panel was designed to hide the deck railing just outside with the lower 'branches'.

This pair of windows coordinates with the interior, but they weren’t designed to match the sofa. And actually, the right hand panel was designed to hide the deck railing just outside with the lower ‘branches’.

I come from a background as an architect, and while those projects all have individual designs, every one is a response to the client’s desires, budget, site constraints, building codes, etc. I approach my artwork the same way: so the client wants a red palette because the room has red accents, no problem. I still work in my style, but I also think of it as a creative driving challenge. I make the artwork speak to the client AND satisfy my own creative outlet.
Is this considered commercial, ‘selling out’ to the masses, or simply survival? I would say that is just the way I work – the way I LIKE to work. I thrive with the challenge of creating within tight constraints. The result is still fine art – and it is customized.
On the other hand, when I get requests for sunflowers, magnolias or copies of Frank Lloyd Wright’s windows, I will politely decline the commission and offer various referrals to other glass artists…